Talk:Tag:highway=give way

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At the moment tagstat show more uses of highway=yield (84 vs 13) there's also highway=yield, at 89 vs. 189 uses of give_way, but which has been used longer; first give_way's are from February 2010 vs. July 2008 for yield. But the conversion would be simple, anyway, if any software makes uses of the data. Alv 07:44, 11 June 2010 (UTC) Alv 08:00, 11 June 2010 (UTC)

XAPI shows 184 give ways to 98 yield... --Delta foxtrot2 07:57, 11 June 2010 (UTC)

With so few tags used I doubt it really matter which has been used the longest, what about which was documented first? Alternatively OSM usually defaults to UK english. I highly doubt any software uses either at present, and I also doubt either appears in any presets... --Delta foxtrot2 08:47, 11 June 2010 (UTC)

The point was that what ever is tagged or documented, both are in use and neither is so overwhelmingly popular that it would matter, at least until someone makes use of the information. Alv 09:51, 11 June 2010 (UTC)
I'm planning to tag all the give_way signs in the surrounding suburbs, which is why I wrote a wiki page for this in the first place. --Delta foxtrot2 10:31, 11 June 2010 (UTC)

Right of Passage

In Norway there are something called forkjørsveg, which can be translated with priority road or road with right of passage, where all crossing or entering traffic have to give way. I have not seen this kind of roads anywhere else (these priority roads have signs indicating its right of passage) --Skippern 08:33, 11 June 2010 (UTC)

At least all Scandinavian countries use them - each and every sideroad has a yield (or stop) sign. It might have other implications, such as "no parking on the driving lanes (outside urban areas)". Alv 09:51, 11 June 2010 (UTC)
For some time now, there's Key:priority_road for recording that. Alv 21:04, 15 March 2012 (UTC)
Which seems less objective since you're tagging what someone thinks rather than what's on the ground. Also how do you tag when 2 priority roads intersect? JohnSmith 21:14, 15 March 2012 (UTC)
I tried to improve the tag's mapping guide to emphasize the interim nature of the skipped stubs approach. Two priority roads can not intersect without either road having a =end section before the intersection (and a give_way sign). If a road operator were to forget the end signs by mistake, it wouldn't take long before the first crash. Alv 07:30, 16 March 2012 (UTC)

Interest ? Usage ?

I don't see the value of tagging this excepted for traffic signs collectors perhaps... --Pieren 16:22, 8 July 2010 (UTC)

This sort of information is useful for more accurately calculating fastest routing... --JohnSmith 16:33, 8 July 2010 (UTC)
Can you provide the name of an application using it ? --Pieren 08:56, 9 July 2010 (UTC)
Since when does an application need to support a tag before we can start using it? --JohnSmith 12:46, 9 July 2010 (UTC) {+1, well said Ceyockey)

How to Use?

No sure exactly how to use this - given two ways joining, then the 'give way' only applies to one of the ways, so if I put it on the node of the ways connection how to specify which of the 2 ways it applies to? Or should I create another node just prior to the junction on the applicable way? --Pshipley 01:04, 12 August 2010 (BST)

At this stage most people seem to have just tagged a node with the location, most give way signs usually appear before an intersection, I guess you could use some kind of relation to indicate the 'from' node where the sign is and another 'to' node to indicate the junction/direction effected path. -- JohnSmith 10:11, 12 August 2010 (BST)
That sounds like a modification of how turn restrictions work. --Ceyockey 03:22, 1 December 2010 (UTC)

bad description

Actually we do have a proposal process and if the creator used it, there probably wouldn't be such a bad description. There are no indications on how to use this (on a node part of the highway or beside it). Why is this a highway-tag? There are already established ways to tag traffic_signs. -- Dieterdreist 14:55, 15 September 2010 (BST)