User:TagaSanPedroAko/Philippines Tagging/Power lines/Meralco

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This page covers efforts on mapping of power-related infrastructure owned and operate by Meralco (Manila Electric Company). This is part of efforts to map the power networks of the Philippines

Overview

Meralco, or Manila Electric Company (formerly Manila Electric Railroad and Light Company, that lend the current name) is a private electric utility company that serves Metro Manila, Bulacan, Rizal, Cavite, Laguna (except 4th District municipalities), Batangas (Santo Tomas, First Philippine Industrial Park, Batangas City, and San Pascual), and Quezon (western part, including Lucena). This company provide provides electric power to its customers in those mentioned areas (with some exceptions). Meralco's power system is composed of subtransmission lines connected to National Grid Corporation of the Philippines (distribution) substations, local distribution substations, large industrial customers and some power plants not connected to the national grid, and distribution lines serving the end customers.

Power network

Meralco's power network serves Metro Manila, all of Bulacan, Rizal, and Cavite, western Quezon (including Lucena), majority of Laguna, and parts of Batangas (Santo Tomas, First Philippine Industrial Park, Batangas City, and San Pascual) and Pampanga, and is divided by the subtransmission system that provide the voltage used for the distribution system. The subtransmission systems run at 115,000 volts and 69,000 volts, and mostly uses roadside right of way, except for a few built on dedicated right of way (including those divested from NGCP).

Voltages

115,000 volts

This voltage is used as the subtransmission voltage on most of the Meralco's service area, and is generally largely interconnected (other than two lines connecting NGCP's Tayabas Substation with Meralco's substation with the same name). These lines are mostly on roadside right of way, with posts also used to carry distribution lines and telephone (optic fiber) and CATV lines, other than some which run on dedicated right of way completely or partially. Most lines are now using steel or concrete posts, with only a few lines with wood posts, scheduled for replacement with a concrete or steel one, as many have rotten already with age, and threatened to break during typhoons. These lines feed the 34,500 volts system, but a few feed the 13,800 volt system, such as most substations in Cavite (i.e. Dasmariñas, Rosario, Silang, Tagaytay, and Tagaytay West, with the former two also feeding the 34.5 kV system).

69,000 volts

This voltage is used as the subtransmission voltage on some parts of the Meralco's service area, where 69 kV is the standard voltage used, and is mostly interconnected with NGCP's network. These lines are located in northern Bulacan, and Batangas. Like the 115 kV lines, they mostly use roadside right of way, except for ex-NGCP lines, usually tap lines connecting to the main line using a disconnector switch. Mainly of these lines are using newer steel or concrete posts, but a few has the majority using wooden posts, all sceheduled for replacement due to age (i.e. rotten) and safety concerns (i.e. threatened to break off, especially during typhoons). All these lines exclusively feed the 13,800 volt systems by the substations where the lines connect to.

34,500/20,000 volts,

This is used as a distribution voltage in majority of Meralco's service area, fed by the 115 kV subtransmission system. These lines mostly run on roadside right of way, except for a few. This voltage also feeds the 4,800 volt system (which is being phased out in many places), and the 13,800 volt system (through autotransformer stations, now dismantled or converted to voltage regulation facilities for long 34.5 kV lines, such as those in Quezon). These lines connect to transformers (connecting to the 220 volt system) mounted on posts, but a few connect to kiosk substations (with 500 kVA capacity) by large customers, such as factories, malls, hospitals, and large schools, colleges and universities. The 34.5 kV system also provides the 750 volt and 1,500 volt traction power systems of the MRT and LRT, through kiosk substations with rectifiers.

13,800/7,970 volts

This is used as a distribution voltage in parts of Meralco's service area, fed by the 115 kV (southern Cavite and Los Baños, Laguna) or 69 kV (northerm Bulacan, parts of Candaba, Pampanga, and Batangas City and San Pascual) subtransmission system. Like the 34.5 system, these lines mostly run on roadside right of way, except for a few. With limitations to cover very long distances, unlike the 34.5 kV system, voltage regulators and compensation equipment (i.e. capacitors, ) are placed on long-distance lines. These lines connect to transformers (connecting to the 220 volt system) mounted on posts, usually with one or two bushings, but with a shorter length (about 20 centimeters from the transformer's cover), and a few connect to kiosk substations (with 500 kVA capacity) by large customers, such as factories, malls, hospitals, and large schools, colleges and universities, and some fast-food restaurants. This voltage is used to cover most provinces served by Meralco (where 34.5 kV served only large customers, typically along a major road), but many are eventually converted to 34.5 kV after areas they served became largely urbanized

4,800/2,800 volts

This is used as a distribution voltage in the urbanized areas of cities and municipalities within Meralco's service area, fed by the 34.5 kV system. These lines mostly run on roadside right of way, mostly under the 34.5 kV lines that served larger customers. These lines connect to transformers (connecting to the 220 volt system) mounted on posts, with the difference by having the bushing on the side. Line of this voltage, however, is being converted to the 34.5 kV or completely deenergized and abandoned (with transformers linking customers being converted for use on 34.5 kV or replaced by a new one) to cut costs on maintaining a step-down substation that provides the voltage, and due to aging of the facilities, which used narrower conductors, shorter insulators (about 10 centimeters for pin type, or 15 to 30 centimeters for strain or shackle type), or aging transformers.

Lines

Substations