Talk:Tag:shop=deli

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Gourmet Food Store Distinction Questions

Okay, as a US resident, I find the distinction between a deli and a "gourmet food store" as described being vague? US delis are essentially as described in this article as purveyors of cheese and other often culturally specific food items. Is the distinction made with the "gourmet food store" classification one of quality of the goods sold? Regionally, I am having trouble with the distinction. I have visited several European countries and find there was little difference between shops that call themselves delis between the US and Europe. Also, I am clueless as to how to enter a "gourmet food store" to begin with. Any help or clarification in this matter would be greatly appreciated. PittsburghMapper (talk) 20:30, 15 April 2018 (UTC)

I've tried to tweak the wording a bit but yes, basically the difference between shop=deli and shop=convenience is the "fanciness" of the food. Also, a shop=deli will tend to carry very few non-food items, while a shop=convenience will often have a small selection of batteries, health care products, phone chargers, maybe tobacco, etc.
It's true that even in Europe, the name "deli" is sometimes applied in an aspirational way to humbler shops. But in the USA and Canada, seeing the word "deli" is almost a guaranteed tipoff that the business in question is *not* a shop=deli in the OSM sense.
For reference, here's a shop=convenience in Brooklyn, NY:
HipsterDeli.jpg
Without even seeing the inside, there are some clear clues that this is not a shop=deli. There are Pringles in the window. There are magazines and newspapers for sale. There are cigarettes advertised. None of these would be expected in a gourmet food store.
There are also restaurants/cafes/fast food named "deli" or "delicatessen", such as Katz's Delicatessen in Manhattan. In American usage, "deli" is applied to pretty much any place that will make you a fresh sandwich. This is one of those areas where OSM tagging differs significantly from standard American usage. --Jmapb (talk) 19:26, 7 May 2018 (UTC)