Cincinnati, Ohio/Statistics

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January 2018

As of January 1, 2018, OSM contains 2,960,229 nodes, 364,152 ways, and 2,470 relations in the 16-county Cincinnati metropolitan area (GeoJSON), including:

Pathway statistics

Pathway type[24] Centerline miles Lane miles
Interstate highways 329 1,847
Other freeways[25] 46 188
Public roadways[26] 17,787–18,425 38,168
Alleys 216 N/A
Driveways 611 N/A
Parking aisles 357 N/A
Drive-throughs 9 N/A
All roadways 21,832–22,470 42,317
Hallways 2 N/A
Crosswalks 19 N/A
Sidewalks 229 N/A
Staircases 7 N/A
All footpaths 1,146 N/A
Dedicated bike paths 176 N/A
Bike lanes N/A 76
Shared lanes (sharrows) N/A 19
Turn lanes[27] N/A 335
Speed limits[28] 2,330 N/A
Road bridges 101
Railroads N/A 1,579

By road classification

highway=* Centerline miles Centerline miles of speed limits[28] Completeness
motorway 738 620 84%
motorway_link 267 44 17%
trunk 343 162 47%
trunk_link 26 3 12%
primary 744 224 30%
primary_link 6 1 24%
secondary 1,933 323 17%
secondary_link 5 1 23%
tertiary 2,625 539 21%
tertiary_link 11 1 14%
unclassified 936 35 4%
residential 10,834 352 3%
living_street 3 0 12%
service 3,989 23 1%
raceway 8 0 0%
road 2 0 0%

Instructions

As with Ohio/Statistics#Instructions, download the latest .osm.pbf extracts of Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana from Geofabrik. Then merge them and extract the Cincinnati metropolitan area:

osmium merge data/ohio-latest.osm.pbf data/kentucky-latest.osm.pbf data/indiana-latest.osm.pbf -o data/oki.osm.pbf
curl https://gist.github.com/1ec5/4405a6989ab8a3cac839278b3f6e457a/raw/26c3c168280e9c9b3bedc62d2c3fb5aff7c05945/cincinnati.geojson
osmium extract -p data/cincinnati.geojson data/oki.osm.pbf -o data/cincinnati.osm.pbf

Then install Vainilla and follow the instructions in the tool's readme to generate the pathway statistics.

Notes and references

  1. “NTM SRBB: Stops”. National Transit Map. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Retrieved May 4, 2018. 
  2. “Proposed Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way” (PDF). United States Access Board. July 26, 2011. p. 29. Retrieved May 21, 2018. 
  3. “Frequently Asked Questions – Part 4 – Highway Traffic Signals”. Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices. Federal Highway Administration. April 4, 2018. Retrieved May 21, 2018. 
  4. Tarnoff, Philip J.; Javier Ordonez (March 2004). “Signal Timing Practices and Procedures: State of the Practice”. Institute of Transportation Engineers. p. 3. “A common rule of thumb states that in an urban area there is approximately one signal controller per 1,000 population. This “rule” was tested using data from 75 urban areas. The results of this test are shown in Figure 2. The total population of the analyzed metropolitan areas is 168,895,184. The total number of signals in these metropolitan areas is 153,228. The ratio of signals to population is one signal per 1,102 of population—a value that is very close to the rule of thumb. Using this ratio (1:1,102) and assuming the population of the United States is approximately 290 million, the total number of signals in the United States can be estimated to be 265,000.” 
  5. The Institute of Transportation Engineers calculates this estimate and an annual growth of 2,550 on a per-capita basis.[2][3][4] The Cincinnati–Wilmington–Maysville, OH–KY–IN Combined Statistical Area had an estimated 2,238,265 residents in 2017 for an estimated 2,031 signalized intersections.
  6. A 1999 survey found that major state and local highway departments in the Cincinnati metropolitan area operated a total of 1,433 signalized intersections and expected to operate 1,380 by 2005. Gordon, Steve; Jeff Trombly; Joseph I. Peters (2000). “Tracking the Deployment of the Integrated Metropolitan ITS Infrastructure in Cincinnati, Hamilton: FY99 Results” (PDF). Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office, U.S. Department of Transportation. Archived from the original. If you specify |archiveurl=, you must also specify |archivedate=. 
  7. The OSM figure may be overcounted due to certain traffic signal tagging styles.
  8. 8.0 8.1 “Indiana: Farms, Land in Farms, Value of Land and Buildings, and Land Use: 2012 and 2007” (PDF). 2012 Census of Agriculture. National Agricultural Statistics Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. October 13, 2017. Retrieved May 9, 2018. 
    “Kentucky: Farms, Land in Farms, Value of Land and Buildings, and Land Use: 2012 and 2007” (PDF). 2012 Census of Agriculture. National Agricultural Statistics Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. October 13, 2017. Retrieved May 9, 2018. 
    “Ohio: Farms, Land in Farms, Value of Land and Buildings, and Land Use: 2012 and 2007” (PDF). 2012 Census of Agriculture. National Agricultural Statistics Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. October 13, 2017. Retrieved May 9, 2018. 
  9. Self-intersections forming loops at most 150 feet in radius.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 “2012 Economic Census”. U.S. Census Bureau. October 9, 2015. Retrieved May 24, 2018. 
  11. 609 stations in Southwestern Ohio, according to “List of Active Underground Storage Tanks” (ZIP, CSV). Bureau of Underground Storage Tank Regulations, Ohio Department of Commerce. Retrieved May 9, 2018.  Filter out values of FacilityType other than Gas Station, values of Status other than ABN - Orphaned, or any value of Date_Last_Used, Date_Removed, or AbandonedApproved. Then remove duplicate values of FacilityNumber. Finally, remove rows that have identical values in all the columns FacilityName through OwnerZip.
  12. There are 2,884 stations in Kentucky, including 268 in Northern Kentucky, according to “UST Statewide Database Report” (ZIP, Microsoft Excel). Underground Storage Tank Branch, Division of Waste Management, Department for Environmental Protection, Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet. May 1, 2018. Retrieved May 9, 2018.  Filter out values of AI_TYPE other than RETAIL-Other Retail Trade (44-45) and RETAIL- Retail Trade, Gasoline Stations (447) and the following values of TANK_STATUS_CODE: T96, TAB, TBL, TCP, TEX, TNF, TR8, TRM, TRR, and TUR. Then remove duplicate values of SITE_SEQ_ID. Finally, remove rows that have identical values in all the columns from AI_ID to MAILING_ADDRESS_ZIP. The statewide figure is consistent with the 2,922 stations in 2012 found in Ognibene, Jessica (July 8, 2014). “Public Retail Gasoline Stations by State and Year” (Microsoft Excel). Alternative Fuels Data Center, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Retrieved May 7, 2018. 
  13. 34 convenience stores in Southeastern Indiana, according to “Local Foods”. Purdue University Local Food Program. Retrieved May 9, 2018. 
  14. Field, Katie (April 24, 2018). “Summary of active pipeline mileage by county” (Microsoft Excel). National Pipeline Mapping System, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 9, 2018. 
  15. “NTM SRBB: Routes - Bus”. National Transit Map. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Retrieved May 4, 2018. 
  16. Vilvens, Sheila (March 3, 2017). “Why were Boone County sirens silent as storms ripped through?”. The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  17. “Campbell County Alerting System” (PDF). Campbell County Office of Emergency Management. July 31, 2014. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  18. Schaefer, Ray (April 8, 2000). “New warning sirens cover most of Kenton County”. The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  19. Zarnitz, Erik (October 23, 2013). “Rural NKY communities get new tornado siren”. WLWT-TV. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  20. “Outdoor Warning Siren Locations”. Emergency Management Agency of Butler County, Ohio. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  21. “Outdoor Warning Siren System”. Hamilton County Emergency Management and Homeland Security Agency. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  22. “Outdoor Warning Sirens”. Warren County Emergency Management. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  23. “United States Wind Turbine Database”. United States Geological Survey. April 2018. Retrieved May 19, 2018.  Filter out values of t_state other than IN, KY, or OH. Filter out values of t_county other than the 16 counties in the metropolitan area.
  24. A one-way road tagged highway=motorway/trunk/primary/secondary/tertiary may or may not be one side of a divided road. The lower bound assumes they all are, causing false positives' lengths to be undercounted by half. The upper bound assumes none of them are, double-counting the length of every false negative.
  25. FHWA calls this category “Other freeways and expressways”, but as seen in TIMS, ODOT classifies expressways and super-twos as principal arterials.
  26. Excluding all highway=service roads and roads with access=* values other than access=yes, access=destination, or access=designated.
  27. Only marked or signposted turn lanes; excludes implicit turns.
  28. 28.0 28.1 Maximum speed limits, including advisory speed limits.