Ohio/Statistics

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January 2018

As of January 1, 2018, OSM contains 10,003,605 nodes, 1,029,174 ways, and 11,414 relations in Ohio, including:

Points of interest

Type 2018 OSM 2012 Economic Census[17] Other
NAICS codes Count OSM completeness Year Count OSM completeness
Alternative fuel stations[18] 39 2018 621[19] 6%
Banks, credit unions, and money lenders 1,088 5221 5,100 21%
Bars and pubs 801 7224 2,119 38%
Car washes 288 811192 601 48%
Casinos 9 71321 2 450%
Child care centers 87 6244 2,583 3%
Coffee shops 509 722515 1,785 29%
Colleges 99 6112 N/A[20] N/A
Convenience stores 1,044 445120, 447110 4,725 22% 2018 5,686[21] 18%
Dentists 135 6212 4,323 3%
Doctor's offices 142 6211 7,134 2%
Elementary and secondary schools 7,906 6111 N/A[20] N/A 2017 4,199[22][23] 188%
Fast food restaurants 2,398 722513 9,009 27%
Gas stations 2,457 447 3,955 62% 2018 4,368[24][25] 56%
Hospitals 244 622 237 103%
Hotels, motels, and bed-and-breakfasts 896 7211 1,362 66%
Insurance agents 118 52421 5,049 2%
Museums 243 71211 170 143%
Pharmacies and drugstores 452 446110 1,453 31%
Quarries 132 21 640 21%
Restaurants 3,241 722511, 722514 7,525 43%
RV parks 173 7212 229 76%
Supermarkets and grocery stores 754 445110 2,089 36%
Universities 102 6113 N/A[20] N/A
Zoos 11 71213 24 46%

Pathways

Pathway type Centerline miles Lane miles
2018 OSM[26] 2016 ODOT/FHWA[27] Completeness[28] 2018 OSM 2016 ODOT/FHWA[29][30] Completeness[31]
Interstate highways 1,615 1,574 103% 8,293 8,301 100%
Other freeways[32] 939 914 103% 3,889 3,768 103%
Public roadways[33] 137,163–141,302 122,974 112–115% 284,180 262,350 108%
Alleys 1,617 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Driveways 2,338 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Parking aisles 1,492 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Drive-throughs 33 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
All roadways 155,262–159,409 N/A N/A 302,691 N/A N/A
Hallways 10 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Crosswalks 101 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Sidewalks 1,647 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Staircases 13 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
All footpaths 6,251 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dedicated bike paths 1,493 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Bike lanes N/A N/A N/A 303 N/A N/A
Shared lanes (sharrows) N/A N/A N/A 137 N/A N/A
Turn lanes[34] N/A N/A N/A 376 N/A N/A
Speed limits[35] 10,631 N/A 8% N/A N/A N/A
2018 OSM[36] 2017 FHWA NBI[37] Completeness
Road bridges 588 600 98%
2018 OSM 2017 FHWA[38] Completeness
Toll roads 261 241 108%
2018 OSM 2012 AAR[39][3] Completeness 2018 OSM 2012 AAR Completeness
Railroads N/A 5,288 N/A 15,082 N/A N/A
2018 OSM 2018 PHMSA NPMS[40] Completeness
Pipelines 3,947 14,530 27%

By road classification

highway=* Centerline miles Centerline miles of speed limits[35] Completeness
motorway 5,077 3,603 71%
motorway_link 1,563 87 6%
trunk 2,221 567 26%
trunk_link 173 4 2%
primary 5,392 939 17%
primary_link 29 2 6%
secondary 13,210 1,132 9%
secondary_link 21 1 5%
tertiary 22,552 1,715 8%
tertiary_link 24 2 7%
unclassified 8,731 309 4%
residential 82,549 2,200 3%
living_street 11 2 22%
service 17,773 67 0%
raceway 61 0 0%
road 20 1 3%

Instructions

To generate these statistics, download the latest .osm.pbf extract from Geofabrik, then use osmium to filter it by the desired tags. For example, the following command filters out everything but parking lots and displays the number of elements in the resulting extract:

osmium tags-filter data/ohio-latest.osm.pbf -R 'nwr/amenity=parking' --overwrite -o data/ohio-latest-parking-lots.osm.pbf
osmium fileinfo -e data/ohio-latest-parking-lots.osm.pbf

To count unique tag values, use this formula:

osmium tags-filter data/ohio-latest.osm.pbf -R 'nwr/*:etymology*' --overwrite -o data/ohio-latest-etymologies.opl
cut -d' ' -f8 data/ohio-latest-etymologies.opl | cut -c2- | grep -oE '\w+:etymology(:wikidata)?=[^,]+' | cut -d'=' -f2 | sort -u | wc -l

osmium tags-filter data/ohio-latest.osm.pbf -R 'nwr/*:pronunciation' --overwrite -o data/ohio-latest-pronunciations.opl
cut -d' ' -f8 data/ohio-latest-pronunciations.opl | cut -c2- | grep -oE '\w+:pronunciation=([^,]+)' | cut -d'=' -f2 | grep -oE '[^;]+' | sort -u | wc -l

Then install Vainilla and follow the instructions in the tool's readme to generate the pathway statistics.

See also

Notes and references

  1. “Bridge Condition by Functional Classification Count 2017”. Federal Highway Administration. December 31, 2017. Retrieved May 7, 2018. 
  2. “Total at-grade highway-rail crossings for state=Ohio”. Federal Railroad Administration Office of Safety Analysis. Retrieved May 7, 2018. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Only includes freight rail.
  4. “2012 National Traffic Signal Report Card Technical Report” (PDF). National Transportation Options Coalition. 2012. p. 7. Retrieved May 8, 2017. 
  5. “Proposed Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way” (PDF). United States Access Board. July 26, 2011. p. 29. Retrieved May 21, 2018. 
  6. “Frequently Asked Questions – Part 4 – Highway Traffic Signals”. Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices. Federal Highway Administration. April 4, 2018. Retrieved May 21, 2018. 
  7. Tarnoff, Philip J.; Javier Ordonez (March 2004). “Signal Timing Practices and Procedures: State of the Practice”. Institute of Transportation Engineers. p. 3. “A common rule of thumb states that in an urban area there is approximately one signal controller per 1,000 population. This “rule” was tested using data from 75 urban areas. The results of this test are shown in Figure 2. The total population of the analyzed metropolitan areas is 168,895,184. The total number of signals in these metropolitan areas is 153,228. The ratio of signals to population is one signal per 1,102 of population—a value that is very close to the rule of thumb. Using this ratio (1:1,102) and assuming the population of the United States is approximately 290 million, the total number of signals in the United States can be estimated to be 265,000.” 
  8. There were an estimated 311,000 signalized intersections in the U.S. as of 2011.[4] The Institute of Transportation Engineers calculates this estimate and an annual growth of 2,550 on a per-capita basis.[5][6][7] Ohio had an estimated 11,658,609 residents in 2017 for an estimated 10,580 signalized intersections.
  9. The OSM figure may be overcounted due to certain traffic signal tagging styles.
  10. 10.0 10.1 “Farms, Land in Farms, Value of Land and Buildings, and Land Use: 2012 and 2007” (PDF). 2012 Census of Agriculture. National Agricultural Statistics Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. October 13, 2017. Retrieved May 9, 2018. 
  11. “Roundabouts Database Reports”. Roundabouts Database. Kittelson & Associates. 2018. Retrieved May 21, 2018. 
  12. “The Ohio Township Roster” (Office Open XML Workbook). Ohio Secretary of State. May 4, 2017. Retrieved January 4, 2018. 
  13. “Public and Private Airports, Heliports, and Seaplane Bases by State”. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. August 2015. Retrieved May 7, 2018. 
  14. “United States Wind Turbine Database”. United States Geological Survey. April 2018. Retrieved May 19, 2018.  Filter out values of t_state other than OH.
  15. 285 sites according to “Power Siting Wind Case Status” (PDF). Ohio Power Siting Board. February 5, 2018. p. 1. Retrieved May 9, 2018. 
  16. “Vehicular Toll Ferries in the United States”. Office of Highway Policy Information, Federal Highway Administration. January 1, 2017. Retrieved May 7, 2018. 
  17. “2012 Economic Census”. U.S. Census Bureau. October 9, 2015. Retrieved May 10, 2018. 
  18. Compressed natural gas, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, electric charging, biodiesel, hydrogen, and liquefied natural gas.
  19. “Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State”. Alternative Fuels Data Center, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. Retrieved May 8, 2018. 
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 The Economic Census reports 1,772 educational institutions (excluding educational support services), but it does not distinguish elementary and secondary schools from colleges and universities as NAICS does.
  21. “U.S. Convenience Stores Continue Growth” (PDF). NACS Magazine. National Association of Convenience Stores. February 2018. 
  22. “Fall Enrollment (Headcount) - October 2017 Public Districts and Buildings” (Microsoft Excel). Ohio Department of Education. January 30, 2018. Retrieved May 12, 2018.  Number of rows in the fy_hdcnt_bldg and fy18_hdcnt_cs sheets.
  23. “Fall Enrollment (ADM) - October 2017 Non-Public Buildings” (Microsoft Excel). Ohio Department of Education. January 30, 2018. Retrieved May 12, 2018.  Number of unique values in the irn column of the fy18_nonpub sheet.
  24. There are 4,368 active, licensed gas station facilities according to “List of Active Underground Storage Tanks” (ZIP, CSV). Bureau of Underground Storage Tank Regulations, Ohio Department of Commerce. Retrieved May 9, 2018.  Filter out values of FacilityType other than Gas Station, values of Status other than ABN - Orphaned, or any value of Date_Last_Used, Date_Removed, or AbandonedApproved. Then remove duplicate values of FacilityNumber. Finally, remove rows that have identical values in all the columns FacilityName through OwnerZip.
  25. There were 4,617 gas stations in 2012 according to Ognibene, Jessica (July 8, 2014). “Public Retail Gasoline Stations by State and Year” (Microsoft Excel). Alternative Fuels Data Center, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Retrieved May 7, 2018.  This figure comes from the defunct National Petroleum News.
  26. A one-way road tagged highway=motorway/trunk/primary/secondary/tertiary may or may not be one side of a divided road. The lower bound assumes they all are, causing false positives' lengths to be undercounted by half. The upper bound assumes none of them are, double-counting the length of every false negative.
  27. "Public Road Length - 2016, Miles By Functional System". In “Highway Statistics 2016”. Federal Highway Administration. 2017-09-18. p. HM-20. 
  28. Figures over 100% may be due to a combination of new road construction since 2016, overcounting divided highways, privately-owned roads missing access=* tags, overnoding in TIGER-imported roads in some counties such as Clermont County, and TIGER-imported driveways incorrectly classified as highway=residential ways.
  29. "Functional System Lane-Length - 2016, Lane-Miles". In “Highway Statistics 2016”. Federal Highway Administration. 2017-09-18. p. HM-60. 
  30. Rural minor collector and rural/urban local functional system lane miles are estimates.
  31. Figures over 100% may be due to a combination of new road construction since 2016, privately-owned roads missing access=* tags, overnoding in TIGER-imported roads in some counties such as Clermont County, and TIGER-imported driveways incorrectly classified as highway=residential ways. Figures less than the corresponding centerline mile figures may be due to multilane roads missing lanes=* tags.
  32. FHWA calls this category “Other freeways and expressways”, but as seen in TIMS, ODOT classifies expressways and super-twos as principal arterials.
  33. Excluding all highway=service roads and roads with access=* values other than access=yes, access=destination, or access=designated.
  34. Only marked or signposted turn lanes; excludes implicit turns.
  35. 35.0 35.1 Maximum speed limits, including advisory speed limits.
  36. The TIGER import erroneously tagged any road with "bridge" in the name as a bridge. Many but not all occurrences have been corrected.
  37. “Bridge Condition by Functional Classification Length 2017”. Federal Highway Administration. December 31, 2017. Retrieved May 7, 2018. 
  38. “Interstate System Toll Roads in the United States”. Office of Highway Policy Information, Federal Highway Administration. January 1, 2017. Retrieved May 7, 2018. 
  39. “Miles of Freight Railroad Operated by Class of Railroad”. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Retrieved May 7, 2018. 
  40. Field, Katie (April 24, 2018). “Summary of active pipeline mileage by county” (Microsoft Excel). National Pipeline Mapping System, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 9, 2018.