Relation:route

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Public-images-osm logo.svg route
CycleLayer2.png
Description
Used to describe routes of various kinds.
Group: Route
Members
  • Way - (blank)
  • Way - forward
  • Way - backward
  • Node - stop:<number>
  • Node - stop
  • Node - forward:stop:<number>
  • Node - forward:stop
  • Node - backward:stop:<number>
  • Node - backward:stop
  • Node Way Area - platform:<number>
  • Node Way Area - platform
Status: Approved

A route is a customary or regular line of passage or travel, often predetermined and publicized. Routes consist of paths taken repeatedly by people and vehicles: a ship on the North Atlantic route, a car on a numbered road, a bus on its route or a cyclist on a national route.

A route (or variant) may belong to a route master relation. A route master contains all the directions, variant routes and information for that route. It permits OSM to distinguish the two routes of a two-way trip.

Note that a road sometimes has more than one number. Numerous major European "E" routes share ways (sometimes exactly the same ways) with national numbered routes.


Rendered cycle routes following this scheme
Rendered tram and bus routes following this scheme
Rendered walking routes following this scheme

Tags

Key Value Explanation
type route Indicates this relation represents a route.
route road / bicycle / foot / hiking / bus / trolleybus / ferry / detour / train / tram / mtb (mountainbike) / horse / ski / snowmobile / inline_skates A road (e.g., the ways making up the A7 auto route), bicycle route, hiking route or whatever route (see also #Route relations in use).
name a name The route is known by this name (e.g., "Jubilee Cycle Route", "Pembrokeshire Coastal Path").
ref a reference The reference by which this route is known. e.g. A7, NCN 11, Citi 4. Recommended if no parent relation route_master=* exists. Otherwise, it is optional.
network ncn / rcn / lcn / nwn / rwn / ... A wider network of routes of which this is one example. For example, the UK's national cycle network or a local cycle network.
operator operator name The route is operated by this authority/company etc; e.g., "Stagecoach Cambridge", "Eurostar".
state proposed / alternate / temporary / connection Sometimes routes may not be permanent (i.e., diversions), or may be in a proposed state (e.g., UK NCN routes are sometimes not official routes pending some negotiation or development). Connection is used for routes linking two different routes or linking a route with for example a village centre.
symbol symbol description Describes the symbol that is used to mark the way along the route; e.g., "Red cross on white ground" for the "Frankenweg" in Franconia, Germany.
colour=* a color name or a hex triplet (optional) Colour code noted in hex triplet format. Especially useful for public transport routes. Example: "#008080" for teal colour.
description a short description What is special about this route.
distance distance (optional) The distance covered by this route, if known. For information of users and automatic evaluation; e.g., of completeness. Given including a unit and with a dot for decimals. (e.g., "12.5km").
ascent=* ascent (optional) The ascent covered by a route (default units are metres; specify others explicitly). If a route has start and end point at different altitude use descent too.
descent=* descent (optional) The descent covered by a route (default units are metres; specify others explicitly). Use it only if it differs from the ascent (different altitude at start/endpoint of a route).
roundtrip=* yes/no (optional) Use roundtrip=no to indicate that a route goes from A to B and instead of being circular (roundtrip=yes).

Members

Way/node Role Recurrence? Discussion
Way (blank)/route Zero or more The ways making up the route.
Way forward/backward Zero or more If a route should be followed in only one direction for some or all of its length, the "role" can indicate this for some or all of the constituent ways. "Forward" means the route follows this way only in the direction of the way, and "backward" means the route runs only against the direction of the way. Rendered on the cycle map (example).
Way north/south/east/west Zero or more In North America, numbered route signs include a posted travel direction (role : north, role : south, role : east, role : west) that should be conveyed in the route's relation.
Way link Zero or more Link roads (highway=*_link) from and to the route. See highway=motorway_link.
Node stop:<number> Zero or more A bus stop or train halt, on the route. The order of the members in the relation should be identical to the order in the timetable. The number is not needed to preserve the order of stops. It is only a guide to help mappers finding missing or misplaced stops. You can use role : stop instead, if you like.
Node stop Zero or more A bus stop or train halt/station, on the route. The order of the members in the relation should be identical to the order in the timetable.
Node forward:stop:<number>
backward:stop:<number>
Zero or more A bus stop or train halt, on the route, which is to be used only in one direction. The direction is related to the direction of the way. It has nothing to do with toward or away from any bus station or terminus. The order of the members in the relation should be identical to the order in the timetable. The number is not needed to preserve the order of stops. It is only a guide to help mappers finding missing or misplaced stops. You can use role : forward:stop or role : backward:stop instead if you like.
Node forward:stop
backward:stop
Zero or more A bus stop or train halt on the route that is used only in one direction. The direction is related to the direction of the way. It has nothing to do with toward or away from any bus station or terminus. The order of the members in the relation should be identical to the order in the timetable.
Node Way Area platform:<number> Zero or more A bus or train platform belonging to the route. The order of the members in the relation should be identical to the order of the stops in the timetable. The number is not needed to preserve the order of platforms. It is only a guide to help mappers finding missing or misplaced platforms. You can use role : platform instead if you like.
Node Way Area platform Zero or more A bus or train platform belonging to the route. The order of the members in the relation should be identical to the order of the stops in the timetable.
Node guidepost Zero or more A guidepost which refers the route. See information=guidepost.
Node Way Area * Zero or more All commonly used values according to Taginfo

Route relations in use

Key Value Element Comment Rendering Photo
route bicycle Relation Cycle routes explains how to tag cycle routes.
Ystadstartingpointcykelsparetostkusten06040011.png
route bus Relation The route a public bus service takes. See Buses.
EDS-FullLED-Mobitec.JPG
route inline_skates Relation Inline has more information on the subject.
Signalisation Skatingroute.svg
route canoe Relation Route for canoeing through a waterway.
route detour Relation Route for fixed detour routes. Examples are Bedarfsumleitung in Germany and uitwijkroute in the Netherlands
route ferry Way Relation The route a ferry takes from terminal to terminal Please make sure to add at least one node per tile (zoom level 12), better at least one every few km, so offline editors catch it with bbox requests.
Ferry route mapnik.png
route hiking Way Relation Hiking explains how to tag hiking routes.
Hærvejen vandretureskilt.jpg
route light_rail Way S-Bahn routes
S-Bahn Berlin Baureihe 481.jpg
route mtb Way Mountain biking explains how to tag mtb routes.
Mountain bikers this way^ - geograph.org.uk - 744534.jpg
route pipeline Way For pipelines, pipeline markers, and pipeline stations.
route piste Relation Route of a piste (e.g., snowshoe or XC-Ski trails) in a winter sport area.
Snowshoe trail.jpg
route power Way where power lines use the same towers (the same way).
route railway Relation A sequence of railway ways, often named (e.g., Channel Tunnel). See Railways.
route road Relation Can be used to map various road routes/long roads.
2014-05-16 15 58 16 Sign for Interstate 95 northbound on Interstate 95 in Ewing, New Jersey.JPG
route ski Relation For ski tracks (e.g., XC-Ski Trails User:Langläufer/Loipemap).
Langlauf Loipe.jpg
route train Relation Train services (e.g., London-Paris Eurostar) See Railways.
Transports Publics du Chablais - Zuglaufschild - 01.jpg
route tram Relation See Trams for more information on tagging tram services.
Cobra3058.JPG
route user defined Node Area All commonly used values according to Taginfo.

This table is a wiki template with a default description in English. Editable here.

Public transport routes

Bus routes (also trolley bus)

Main article: Buses

Key Value Comment
type route (mandatory)
route bus
trolleybus
share_taxi
(mandatory)
ref reference The reference by which the route is known. e.g. 4, 4A, X13, IR 3114, etc. Recommended if no parent relation route_master=* exists. Otherwise, it is optional.
operator operator Name of the company that operates the route; e.g., Deutsche Bahn AG, Connex, Interconnex usw.
name individual name The name of the route or line; e.g., "Orient Express" "Thalys". (optional)
network local / regional network Name (abbr.) of the network; e.g., BVG, RMV. (optional)
wheelchair yes / no / limited Indicates if the buses on the route are equipped with ramps or elevators for wheelchairs. (optional)
colour ex: red / #FFEEDD The "official" color for the bus route. identifiers in some cities. (optional)

öpnvkarte.de, openptmap.org and openstreetbrowser.org render public transportation routes.

Some examples in use:

Railway routes (light rail, metro, mainline, monorail, etc.)

Main article: Railway Railway routes can be used to describe both a particular part of the infrastructure that is known by a distinct name (for example East Coast Main Line) or a railway service that is identified to the public with a particular identifier or name (such as the Orient Express). Discussion on tagging for different purposes is taking place on talk transit (Aug09).

Key Value Comment
type route
route train
subway
ref reference The reference of the line. e.g. IR 3114. Recommended if no parent relation route_master=* exists. Otherwise, it is optional.
operator operator Name of the company that operates the route; e.g., Deutsche Bahn AG, Connex, Interconnex usw.
name individual name Only if there is a special name of the route or line e.g., "Orient Express" "Hammersmith and City" (optional)
network local / regional network Name (abbr.) of the network; e.g., BVG, RMV (optional)
wheelchair yes / no / limited If the trains on the route are equipped with ramps or elevators for wheelchairs. Note that, even if the trains are equipped, not all stations on the route may be suitable, or not all platforms may be accessible (optional)
colour ex: red / #FFEEDD If the railway route has an "official" color, for example metro lines in some cities. (optional)

Route relations also could be used to designate railway lines that are operated by one or more train operators. Some examples can be found at Open Rail Map/NL.

öpnvkarte.de, openptmap.org and openstreetbrowser.org render public transportation routes.

Some examples in use:

Tram routes

Main article: Trams

Key Value Comment
type route
route tram
ref reference The reference of the line. e.g. IR 3114. Recommended if no parent relation route_master=* exists. Otherwise it is optional.
operator operator Name of the company that operates the route; e.g., Deutsche Bahn AG, Connex, Interconnex usw.
name individual name Common name "Orient Express" "Thalys" (optional); "Line 4" is not a name but a ref, so ref=4 should be used
network local / regional network Name (abbr.) of the network; e.g., BVG, RMV (optional)
wheelchair yes / no / limited If the trams on the route are equipped with ramps or elevators for wheelchairs.
colour ex: red / #FFEEDD The tram, subways and buses might have "official" colour identifiers in some cities.

öpnvkarte.de, openptmap.org and openstreetbrowser.org render public transportation routes.

Some examples:

Detours

Route Network Description
detour Local detours (used in the Netherlands and Germany). Detours are routes that avoid traffic jams on motorways, usually leading from one exit to the next.

Other routes

Road routes

Route Network Description
road e-road European E-road network
road US:I Interstate Highways Relations, USA
road US:US United States Numbered Highway Relations, USA
road US:xx State highways in the United States, where xx is the state's postal abbreviation. Many states also have county route networks, and some have several tiers of state-owned roads.
road BAB German Autobahn
road ca_transcanada Canadian Trans-Canada highways
road ca_on_primary Ontario primary highways
road pl:national Polish Road Network - national roads
road by:national [1] Belarusian Road Network - national roads
road ru:national Автодороги России - national roads
road BR Brazilian Federail Highways
road BR:xx Brazilian state highways, where xx is replaced by a state code (RJ = Rio de Janeiro, MG = Minas Gerais, etc.)
road bg:national Bulgarian Road Network - national roads
road ja:national Japanese national roads
road ja:prefectural Japanese prefectural roads
road ua:national Ukrainian national roads
road za:national South African national roads
road za:regional South African regional roads
road na Namibian roads

Cycle routes (also mountain bike)

Cycle routes are mapped extensively with route relations, and OSM cycle map will render route relations following this proposal.

In general it is probably a good idea to add the tags: "type => route" and "route => bicycle" (or "route => mtb"). However, the cycle map still will render a route, even if tags are not present.

The following tags are used in rendering:

Key Value Comment
network icn / ncn / rcn / lcn Specify the network as a international route, national route, a regional route or a local route, as per the normal tagging of cycle routes
ref a reference (optional) references work best on the map if just the number is used, so for NCN 4: "4". The network tag correctly distinguishes the type, so just use "ref" and not "ncn_ref" or similar.
state proposed (optional) Routes are sometimes not official routes, pending some negotiation or development. Maps may choose to render these routes differently, e.g. as dotted lines.
route network Description
bicycle icn International cycling network: long distance routes used for cycling routes that cross continents
bicycle ncn National cycling network: long distance routes used for cycling routes that cross countries
bicycle rcn Regional cycling network: used for cycling routes that cross regions

In Belgium and the Netherlands this is used for the cycle node networks

bicycle lcn Local cycling network: used for small local cycling routes. Could be touristic loops or routes crossing a city

Some examples in use:

CycleLayer2.png
An international cycling map created from OSM data is available, provided by Andy Allan. The map rendering is still being improved, the data are updated every few days. It shows National Cycle Network cycle routes, other regional and local routes, and other cycling-specific features, such as:
  • dedicated cycle tracks and lanes
  • bicycle parking
  • contours and hill colouring
  • bike shops
  • proposed bike routes (or numbering protocols), contrasted with the Lonvia map, below, which does not show proposed routes, but actual routes only

http://www.opencyclemap.org/

Lonvia's Cycling Map by Sarah Hoffman is an overlay which shows marked cycle routes around the world. Updated daily, it renders actual routes without the state=proposed tag. Therefore no proposed routes (or numbering protocols) are displayed.

Walking routes (also hiking and pilgrimage)

Main article: Walking Routes

Hiking routes are extensively mapped with route relations, and the Lonvia map will render route relations following this proposal and the osmc:symbol=*

Instead of the tag route=hiking there is less frequently also used route=foot.

Don't use route=pilgrimage (almost nonexistent) but add pilgrimage=yes to a hiking-route.

Hiking routes are rendered for selected areas in Germany in a hiking and trail riding map (german). The tags required for rendering are:

Tag Description
type=route
route=foot or

route=hiking (used more often) or

name=* Meaningful route name suitable for identifying this route.
symbol=* Verbal description of the route marker symbols.
osmc:symbol=* Coded description of the route marker symbols.
Route Network Description
hiking iwn International walking network: long distance paths used for walking routes that cross several countries, for example the Camino de Santiago
hiking nwn National walking network: long distance paths used for walking routes that cross countries
hiking rwn Regional walking network: used for walking routes that cross regions

In Belgium and the Netherlands this tag is used for the walking node networks

hiking lwn Local walking network: used for small local walking routes. Could be touristic loops or routes crossing a city

Inline skating routes

Inline Skating routes have been mapped mainly in Switzerland EN:Switzerland/InlineNetwork with route relations. Lonvias Skating map will render such routes. In general it is probably a good idea to add the tags: "type => route" and "route => inline_skates". The following tags are used in rendering:

Key Value Comment
network international / national / regional / local Specify the network as a international route, national route, a regional route, or a local route
ref a reference (optional) references work best on the map if just the number is used, so for national 4: "4". The network tag correctly distinguishes the type, so just use "ref".
state proposed (optional) Routes are sometimes not official routes pending some negotiation or development -- the map renders these routes dotted.

More material on tagging inline skates relevant information: Inline Skating page (currently available only in German

Some examples in use:

Other route types in use

This is a table with possible route tags being used right now:

route type Description
fitness_trail For a fitness trail with extra exercise stations
foot See hiking which is used more often.
horse
inline_skates
running Used for marked running routes, usually 2km–20km, that are used for exercise
snowmobile For snowmobile routes. Either between two destinations or a collection of routes operated by someone
taxi See also: route=share_taxi
trolleybus See bus
cycling Used for cycling events (like stages of the Tour de France). For (recreational) cyclenetwork use bicycle
historic Historic routes, such as horse-pack trails used for postal routes, ancient roads, etc. Often parts are lost. Please include an appropriate historic=*-value.
Please add here

How to map

Step by step guide

How to create a new route (it is slightly different if you want to add ways to an existing route).

Potlatch

  1. Ensure all ways that the route runs along exist and are appropriately tagged (e.g., highway=footway)
  2. Select the first way and click on the second symbol on the right side, which looks like two chain segments.
  3. Select a relation from the drop-down menu, if there is an existing relation in this area that is appropriate. If the existing relation you want to choose is far away, use the search function. Otherwise, select Create a new relation and click Add.
    1. Add a type tag with the value route.
    2. Add additional tags as needed. (Use the + button)
    3. Click OK.
  4. The relation has been added to the way. The grey box to the right of the relation details and to the left of the X is the input field for the way's role within the relation. See the Members section above for details of roles within the route relation type.
  5. Repeat steps 2–4, selecting the appropriate relation (the one just created) in step 3.

JOSM

  1. Ensure all ways along which the route runs exist and are appropriately tagged (e.g., highway=footway)
  2. Make sure the relation pane (Alt+Shift+R) is open
  3. Select New in the relation pane to create a new relation
  4. Fill in the appropriate tags in the dialog that pops up, adding at least type=route and preferrably name as well with a name for the route
  5. Click OK
  6. Now select some or all of the ways you would like to add to the relation using the normal select (S) tool, then click Edit in the relation pane with your relation highlighted. The relation editing dialog will pop up
  7. Click Add selection in the relation dialog to add the selected ways to the relation.

Multiple routes share the same path

Especially with bicycle routes, often multiple routes run along the same ways for a far distance. There exist so many different bicycle route networks that are operated by different entities that it is not unusual that some of these networks overlap. The EuroVelo routes, for example, use the existing infrastructure in many countries. There are two practices at the moment, if segments of multiple routes share the same way.

  • Add the ways to all relations of the routes that they belong to.
  • Split the routes into part relations and make super relations (relations that don’t contain ways but instead other relations). Then add the segment that is shared by the routes to all of them.

Both practices each have advantages and disadvantages.

Adding the ways to multiple route relations
  • When many routes share one path, it can be a lot of work to map a new part of the route, because you have to add the ways to all relations.
  • People might not see that the path also is used by other routes and might forget to apply their changes to all relations. Thus the data may become inconsistent.
  • This is probably the easier way, as it is somewhat hard for beginners to split relations into parts and to find out which part they have to edit.
  • Relations might become very big, which makes it hard to work with them (analyzers need more time to process them, drawing them into the map will take a lot of JavaScript CPU time).
  • If you don’t use super relations at all, you also have to add alternative routes and excursions to your relation. This makes it hard for analyzers and tools to understand the route. Role=excursion and role=alternative have been suggested, but they still don’t say which way belongs to which excursion (if there are multiple ones).
  • It is the purpose of relations to group objects. When two primary roads share the same street at some section, we don’t create two ways that share the same nodes. So we shouldn’t create two relations that share the same ways.
Creating super-relations for routes
  • Current renderers (like the CycleMap) don’t support super-relations, so they don’t show the ref and the network tag of a super-relation. Currently, all these tags have to be added to all part relations, which is a lot of work (especially as the parts need to have the different refs of all the routes they belong to).
  • It is said to be good mapping practice to keep relations one way. So alternative routes and excursions need to be put into a different relation. So you often need a super-relation even without splitting the route into parts.
  • Tools and analyzers (like the OSM Relation Analyzer, especially the GPX export function) don’t support super-relations yet. This makes it hard to analyze a route as a whole (which is important, for example, to calculate how much of a route already has been mapped). (Note: OSM Route Manager supports subrelations)
  • There is no documented convention on how to handle super-relations. On first glance it appears simple--just take over all tags to all members--but it is not. There are tags where this makes no sense or which change the context and meaning when handed over to a member relation; e.g., distance or note. The same applies to roles other than in base relation, e.g. forward/backward.
  • Super-relations can become very confusing when a relation belongs to multiple super-relations or a way belongs to multiple relations. In that case it is no longer deterministic from which relation a certain relation or way will receive its tags.
  • When someone maps a new route, they might have to split other routes that share ways with it. People editing these other routes might get confused when the number of subrelations keeps changing the whole time.
  • Current editors miss advanced relation editing features, such as “Split relation” (and also super-relation rendering). Things can get very confusing when one route consists of hundreds of small part relations.
  • One motto of OSM is "Don't map for the renderers". If it is considered the more natural way of mapping to create super-relations, then the missing support in the renderers and tools should not stop us from doing so.
  • Consider that super-relations are not necessarily included when requesting a set of data from the server. So depending on whether or not super-relations were included, the data is interpreted differently. As you cannot tell from a way or relation whether it is member of another relation, you never are quite sure whether you are seeing all the relevant data.
  • It is common sense to create super-relations if one complete route is part of another route (like the German D6 is with EuroVelo EV6). If EV6 now shares only a part of another way in another country, we will have to create segments anyway (else we end up with a relation that contains both sub-relations and ways). We should either use the one method or the other.
  • People need to know only the route that they are mapping. When someone maps the German D6 route, he doesn’t even need to know the EuroVelo network (as EV signs might not exist in his area), because, as with a super-relation, his part of the route gets added automatically to all parent relations. This fits the OSM concept better: When everyone maps the places and things he knows, a complete map of the world evolves.

At the moment it seems to be practice to create part-relations, if the shared segment is relatively big compared to the total length of a route. For a national bicycle route, 20 km might be a good limit. For shorter parts the single ways might be added to all relations they belong to. (Of course this is only a rule of thumb. Nothing of this is the official way of mapping.) It also might be important how many different way objects a segment consists of in OSM. It might be not very useful to create segments, if the route consists of motorways (as they only contain of a few, long ways), while bicycle routes often go through cities and residential areas where many ways would have to be added if there were multiple relations.

Another point when deciding which tagging method to use is to find out if the routes use the same ways only by coincidence. Thus, if one route is changed, the other route likely still will be using the old way, so using part-relations would not be appropriate.

Size

Common practice is not to create route relations with more then 250–300 members. If you need to create bigger relations, which could happen easily, make several reasonable-sized relations and unite them in a super-relation as mentioned above. Reasons:

  • Keep the relations editable.
  • Avoid conflicts. The bigger the relation the more likely it is that two users are working on it at the same time.
  • Save the server resources.

There is also a list of Monster Relations.

Navigation on relation:route

Please list applications here that are able to navigate on an existing relation:route.

  • No app known yet.

Notes

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_3166-2:BY

Helping tools